Futurewomen: An Alternate Reality Series chronicles the development of Ma(s)king Her, a dance theater work of speculative fiction about empowered future beings and journeywomen.

EPISODE ONE

 #FUTUREWOMEN: THE ORIGINS

EPISODE TWO

 #FUTUREWOMEN: THE CHARACTERS

EPISODE THREE

 #FUTUREWOMEN: THE QUEST

Futurewomen documents women of color creating, through dialogues, story circles and performance workshops, a collective heroine who must adapt to oppressive environs and circumstances

It combines the drama of artistic creation, representations of original artwork, and alternate reality game (ARG) elements based on those arts. The series will be shot at the University of Chicago’s Arts Incubator in Washington Park in collaboration with Honey Pot Performance as part of their "Crossing Boundaries" residency with Arts + Public Life and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture. The project began production in January 2015 and was released in August 2015. 

 

HONEY POT PERFORMANCE 

Honey Pot Performance (HPP) is a feminist creative collaborative comprised of Meida McNeal, Artistic Director, and Artistic Co-collaborators Felicia Holman, Aisha Jean Baptiste and Abra Johnson. Since 2001, HPP has cultivated an approach integrating movement, theater, and first-voice to examine the nuanced ways people negotiate identity, belonging and difference in their lives and cultural memberships.

The company deconstructs and reworks existing vocabularies of the body (e.g., social dance, ritual, trauma) and relevant social structures (e.g., the economy, house culture as consciousness, popular representations of women of color). We draw upon a central notion found in performance studies, black feminist discourse and sociology: non­-Western, everyday popular and folk forms of cultural performance are valuable sites of knowledge production and cultural capital for subjectivities that often exist outside of mainstream communities.

HPP merges dance, theater, spoken word, song, image, and sound based on ethnographic conversations to explore a concept. We create evening length multifaceted works that shift between personal narrative and macro­societal forces. Our main tools for creation are derived from ethnographic and sociological methodologies; we join these scholarly approaches with artistic improvisation, collaborative writing, and lexicon building (i.e., letting the research and writing of the theatrical world being created suggest the modes of expressivity that should be used to generate its contents) to compose performance material